This Week’s Woodland Grocery Specials

Purslane- an all time favorite garden weed.

Purslane- an all time favorite garden weed.

 

Purslane loves recently disturbed soils. So it is an extremely common “weed” in gardens, as well as around sidewalks, driveways, and playgrounds. It is excellent in salads and stir fry. Nibble on purslane for a wonderful, succulent treat to help ward off dehydration on hot sunny days working in the garden.

 

 

 

Mulberries fill the early summer "berry gap", ripening in between the strawberries and the raspberries, blackberries, and blueberries.

Mulberries fill the early summer “berry gap”, ripening in between the strawberries and the raspberries, blackberries, and blueberries.

 

Mulberries are a wonderful, sweet treat. They freeze well and make delicious pies. They have a lot of natural yeasts, so they don’t keep very long. On the other hand, it is super easy to make homemade mulberry wine and/or mulberry vinegar.

 

 

 

 

Goosefoot, also known as lamb's quarter, is easily identified by the white powder that coats the youngest, goose foot shaped leaves.

Goosefoot, also known as lamb’s quarter, is easily identified by the white powder that coats the youngest, goose foot shaped leaves.

 

Goosefoot tastes very much like spinach, and can be used in all of the same ways. Pick it fresh for salads. Put it on burgers and sandwiches. Cook it lightly with a bit of oil and seasoning to make a side dish. Or blanch and freeze to use all winter in soups, sides, and pasta dishes.

 

 

 

 

The day lilies are just starting to bloom for the season. Day lily petals are a beautiful edible garnish.

The day lilies are just starting to bloom for the season. Day lily petals are a beautiful edible garnish.

 

 

Day lily buds can be cooked like green beans, although you probably wouldn’t want to eat more than a few. Day lily flowers are sightly sedative. If you have trouble sleeping, try making a tea from day lily and chamomile. Note: day lily causes an allergic reaction in a small percentage of people. Only eat a tiny bit the first time and wait an hour to see if you notice any tingling or itching in your mouth or throat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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